UNION-CASTLE LINE
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INTRODUCTION
HISTORICAL GUEST BOOK
CUNARD LINE
P & O and ORIENT LINERS
UNION-CASTLE LINE
ANCHOR LINE
BANK LINE
ELLERMAN LINES
GRAND OLD LADIES
BLUE FUNNEL
PORT LINE
CHRISTIAN SALVESEN
PUFFERS-"AULD REEKIE"
PORT OF LONDON-1962
SAGUENAY TERMINALS
"FAREWELL" UGANDA
BRITISH INDIA LINE
BULLARD KING'S NATAL DIRECT LINE
ZIM PICTORIAL
RFA TANKERS
BROCKLEBANK MEMOIRS
WHITE EMPRESSES
CLAN LINE
ELDER DEMPSTER
MANCHESTER LINERS
BLUE STAR GALLERY
ELDERS & FYFFES
CHRISTENSEN CANADIAN AFRICAN LINES (C.C.A.L.).
C.C.A.L. GALLERY
TRAMP STEAMERS & LIBERTY GALLERY PLUS CANADIAN BUILT "FORTS"
FREEDOM FREIGHTERS
TANKERS
CANADIAN NATIONAL S.S. GALLERY.
BOWATER GALLERY
HARRISON LINE (Mini Gallery)
THE THREE "DELS" & DELTA CRUISE LINES
MISC. CARGO ETC.
WEATHER SHIPS (BRITISH & NORTH AMERICAN)
RADIO OFFICER NOSTALGIA
R/O GALLERY
FOUR YEARS OF FUN WITH ANCHOR LINE by Ian Walker
"A SEAGOING SAGA" - Trevor Inman
ALAN SHARD - WARTIME MN REMINISCENCES
CAPT'N PETER ASHCROFT, EXPLOITS OF
SEA STORIES & OTHERS
AIME'S STORY & PICTORIALS
MEMOIRS OF A RADIO OFFICER
RELATED SITES

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"PENDENNIS CASTLE" ALONGSIDE IN DURBAN - Courtesy Ray Simes

THIS PAGE ALSO INCLUDES THE CIRCUMSTANCES SURROUNDING THE FIRE ABOARD THE "GOOD HOPE CASTLE" AS RELATED BY CAPTAIN PETER ASHCROFT IN ONE OF HIS MORE SERIOUS VEINS !.

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Union-Castle liners East India Dock circa early 1900s

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The painting above is by Simon Fisher and is entitled 'CASTLES AT THE CAPE'.   Resplendant in the fondly remembered Union-Castle lavender-hulled colours,  CAPETOWN CASTLE passes EDINBURGH CASTLE in Capetown Harbour in the 50s,   Table Mountain forming a fine backdrop.

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WINCHESTER/WARWICK CASTLE - SM Aug/05

The WINCHESTER and WARWICK CASTLE (sunk in WWII) were the only ships rebuilt in 1930s to keep their original bows.
 
The RMMV WINCHESTER CASTLE was built in 1930 by Harland & Wolff.  Of 20,000 grt (1939) she was 657 feet in length and 75.6 feet wide.  Twin screw diesels provided a service speed of 20 knots.  Her capacity was for 189 First and 398 Tourist passengers.
 
The second of two sister ships WINCHESTER CASTLE's 1938 refit for the new mail contract resulted in more powerful diesels installed, a single funnel replaced the original pair of squat ones but unlike CARNARVON CASTLE, her bows were unaltered.  As with her fleetmates her war service was followed by a prolonged use as a migrant ship to South Africa and it was not until September 1949 that she resumed the Cape Mail.

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ARUNDEL CASTLE - Courtesy SM Aug/05

ARUNDEL CASTLE's 37 years of service on the Cape Mail was without equal as was her post-1938 appearance above.
 
She was built by Harland & Wolff's of Belfast in 1921.  She was 19,118 grt (post-1937),  661 feet in length and 72 feet in width. Twin screws gave a service speed of 20 knots.  She held 168 First Class and 371 Tourist (post-50).
The ARUNDEL was the Grand Old Lady of the mail fleet and was transformed from a 4 funnel Edwardian profile (she and sister WINDSOR CASTLE  were the only four funnel vessels outside of the North Atlantic) to a rakish two funnel, raked bow greyhound in nine months at her builder's from January to October 1938.  New boilers, extended bows and new turbines upped her speed from 16 to 20 knots.  She was the last mailship to return after the war following austerity emigrant service in September 1950.  Her 37 years 8 months on the Cape Mail was a record.

The advertisement below appeared in travel agents throughout the country enticing those young and ambitious enough to rise to the challenge and emigrate to South Africa.  Many were offered assisted passages,  especially the professions which prospered greatly in the days of apartheid.

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RHODESIA CASTLE & DUNNOTAR CASTLE at Kilindini 1954 Courtesy Ron Bullock

The Union Steamship Company was formed at Southampton in 1853 and 4 years later the Line secured a mail contract to South Africa.  The well known 'Castle' naming policy was started by a Donald Currie who initially traded to India in 1862.  The merged Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company was registered in 1900.

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CARNARVON CASTLE - Courtesy SM Aug/05

Crowds on the A-berth bullnose at Cape Town bid farewell to the 1926-built CARNARVON CASTLE as she heads for Southampton.
 
She was built in 1926 by Harland & Wolff of Belfast, of 20,141 grt (1949) 686 feet in length and 73.5 feet wide, twin screw diesels providing a service speed of 20 knots..  She carried 216 First and 401 Tourist passengers (post-50).
She was also the first mailship to exceed 20,000 tons and the first motor ship on the Cape run. CARNARVON CASTLE ushered in the era of fast diesel-driven express liners on the route,  In 1937,  along with the rest of the fleet, she was extensively rebuilt for the expedited mail contract with new more powerful diesels,  lengthened and finer bows with a raked stem and a single, large streamlined funnel amidships.  Very much a new ship, CARNARVON CASTLE resumed service in July of 1938 and two months later the record passage to Cape Town of 11 days 21 hours which stood until 1954.  After trooping and post-war emigrant service, she was fully refitted and resumed the Mail service on June 1950.

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KENYA CASTLE at Capetown 1954 - Courtesy Ron Bullock

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R.M.M.V. EDINBURGH CASTLE/GOHN - Courtesy John Richardson - SM OCT/77

The Union-Castle fleet consisted of not only the larger mail ships but a series of 'intermediate' size vessels offering a 'Round-Africa' service.  These included the BRAEMAR CASTLE,  DURBAN CASTLE,  KENYA CASTLE,  RHODESIA CASTLE,  WARWICK CASTLE and the little LLANSTEPHEN CASTLE.  All of approximately 17,000 gross tons.  Their itinerary would include Las Palmas,  Ascension,  St. Helena,  Capetown,  Port Elizabeth,  East London, Durban,  Lourenco Marques,  Beira,  Dar-es-Salaam,  Zanzibar,  Tanga,  Mombasa,  Aden,  Port Sudan,  Suez,  Port Said,  Genoa,  Marseilles and Gibraltar.   A 'best' cabin onboard,  with private toilet and bath,  cost 100 pounds for the three and a half week voyage to Capetown.
Smaller ships of the line were known as the 'fruit boats',  the itineraries of which included the Cape ports and the East Coast,  returning to the U.K. through Suez and the Mediterranean.

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R.M.M.V. CAPETOWN CASTLE 27,000 grt, Built 1938, Av. speed 20 kts.

The CAPETOWN CASTLE, with the Blue Peter at the foremast,  prepares to leave Southampton at 1600 Thursday  (this was to change in 1965 due to the accelerated 11.5 day passage to 1300 Fridays)  for yet another trip to South Africa.  She will stop at Las Palmas on the southward journey and probably Madeira on the home run.  Following her initial stay at Capetown she will continue around the coast to Port Elizabeth,  East London and Durban.  After a short stay in Durban she will head southwards for another longer stay in Capetown before the voyage home to Southampton.
 
Seven lavender hulled ships comprised the Union-Castle mail service.  Ultimately jet travel and containerisation of the South African cargo trade led to the end of this service.

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R.M.M.V. STIRLING CASTLE/GYPX Built 1936, 25,554 grt, Av. speed 20 kts.

The picture of the STIRLING CASTLE above emphasizes the 'yacht-like' profile of the CAPETOWN,  STIRLING and ATHLONE CASTLE.  Although built in the thirties these three vessels portrayed an aerodynamic design ahead of their time.

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R.M.M.V. PRETORIA CASTLE - Courtesy A. Duncan - SM JAN/87

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BRAEMAR CASTLE passing at a 'safe' distance - Courtesy Ron Bullock

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Courtesy of Ian McKendrik

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EDINBURGH CASTLE AUTHOR'S PIC. TAKEN IN PORT ELIZABETH.

The EDINBURGH and the PRETORIA CASTLE were the two larger vessels and were arguably the 'best' of the liners and it seemed that everyone wanted to travel in them.  They carried 214 in 1st Class and 541 in Tourist.  By the mid-seventies the Union-Castle liner runs were losing money.  While all of the pre-war liners had been retired there was a joint effort with the South African Corporation  (Safmarine Lines) to continue the service but further decline lay ahead.   In 1975-76 the older EDINBURGH CASTLE and,  what had become the SA ORANJE  (ex PRETORIA CASTLE),  were retired and sold to Far Eastern breakers.

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S.A. ORANJE - Courtesy Peter C. Kohler & SM Aug/05

Launched as PRETORIA CASTLE on August 19th.  1947 by Mrs. Issie Smuts, the wife of the then Prime Minister of South Africa,  Union-Castle Line's 28,705 grt mailship was sold to Safmarine in 1966 and three years was transferred to South African registry.  Renamed S.A. ORANJE,  she served with Safmarine until 1975 when she was sent to Taiwan for demolition.

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PENDENNIS CASTLE/GTPX

Above, PENDENNIS CASTLE, after only 17 years of service, departs Cape Town for the last time in June of 1976.

She was built in 1958 by Harland & Wolff,  of 28, 453 grt, 763 feet in length and 84 feet wide.  Twin screw turbines provided a service speed of 23 knots.  She carried 167 First and 475 Tourist passengers.

In "Mailships of the Union-Castle Line" the PENDENNIS was arguably the best mailship built and she was the fastest of the fleet.  For the first time a mailship had stabilizers which required a lengthening of the hull from 748 to 763 feet on the stocks.  The accommodation layout marked the first departure since the 1930s but she was the last major passenger liner built that was not entirely air-conditioned.  The inspiration for interiors conveying 'tranquility and airy spaciousness' came from Bernard Cayzer, youngest brother of Chairman Sir Nicholas, who engaged the famous interior designer Jean Munro.  When refitted in 1964, all First Class cabins were air-conditioned and 21 more cabins were given private facilities.

WINDSOR CASTLE  was the largest British-built liner since the QUEEN ELIZABETH when she came out.  She reflected the 1960's trend  towards so-called 'superliners' offering unprecendented size,  speed and amenities to compete with growing air competitiion.   She was the largest liner ever built for the Cape run and,  after ORIANA and CANBERRA, the largest non-North Atlantic liner built post-war. 
For the first time on the Cape run there was entirely air-conditioned accommodation,  a permanent 246 seat cinema and 'stem-to-stern' Tourist  Class facilities on 'A' deck.  
Equally impressive was her cargo carrying capacity totalling 352,000 square feet reefer,  271,000 sq. feet general cargo and a 26 car garage.  In 1968 she was fitted with special bulk wine tanks  (capacity 81,000 gallons) for the booming South African wine export industry.

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R.M.M.V. WINDSOR CASTLE - SM OCT/92

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Courtesy Ian McKendrick

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Courtesy Ian McKendrick

In November of 1977 the Union-Castle flagship R.M.S. WINDSOR CASTLE of 37,640 grt completed her final voyage,  the 124th in 17 years.   During this period she had carried 270,000 passengers a total of 1,662,000 miles around the Cape of Good Hope.   She is seen below as the MARGARITA L. at Malta,  shortly after being laid up at Eleusis Bay,  Piraeus awaiting disposition.
 
 
 

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EX WINDSOR CASTLE AT MALTA Photo G. Spiteri, Courtesy T.W. Scull SM JULY/92

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WINDSOR CASTLE - Courtesy of Peter C. Kohler and SM Aug/05

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WINDSOR CASTLE - Courtesy Ron Bullock

Southbound passengers aboard WINDSOR CASTLE/GVTG enjoy their trip in 1969.  A new life awaits for some in South Africa.  In the present socio-political climate, I wonder how many remained in this sad country!

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TRANSVAAL CASTLE AT SEA - Courtesy Peter C. Kohler & SM Aug/05

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Courtesy T.W. Scull - SM JULY/92

The last Union- Castle ship built was the TRANSVAAL CASTLE.  She was advertised as a one-class 'hotel' ship and is seen here in later years as the FESTIVALE of Carnival Cruise Lines.  She then became the ISLAND BREEZE and ultimately BIG RED BOAT III.  

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Courtesy Robert Pabst - SM APRIL/91

Above, a picture of two fine liners taken by Robert Pabst in September of 1963.  Shaw Savill's DOMINION MONARCH and CAPETOWN CASTLE are berthed at Duncan Dock, Capetown.

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KENYA CASTLE - Courtesy Peter C. Kohler & SM Aug/05

KENYA CASTLE,  BRAEMAR CASTLE and RHODESIA CASTLE were refitted in 1958 including dome tops to their funnels (adding 12 feet to their height) and in 1960-61 had their accommodation improved,  partially air-conditioned and berths reduced from 539 to approximately 450.  1961 proved to be the last for the full Round-Africa service with RHODESIA CASTLE,  and WARWICK CASTLE being the eastabout ships and BRAEMAR CASTLE and DURBAN CASTLE being the westabout ones.
 
KENYA CASTLE was one of the three sister ships built specifically for the Round Africa service in 1951-52.  She was not scrapped until 2001 as Chandris AMERIKANIS. 

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Courtesy Barry Ledsom - SM JUNE/88

The TANTALLON CASTLE,  off the Pierhead at Liverpool,  is helped to her berth in Birkenhead.  Also in the background may be seen a Blue Funnel ship of more recent vintage at anchor in mid-stream.
 
These smaller cargo ships of the U-C fleet were known as 'fruitboats',  South African fruit being a predominant part of her return cargo..  All were of between 7 and 8,000 grt.  Sister ships were the RICHMOND CASTLE,  RIEBECK CASTLE,  ROCHESTER CASTLE,  ROSLIN CASTLE,  ROWALLAN CASTLE,  ROXBURGH CASTLE,  RUSTENBERG CASTLE and TINTAGEL CASTLE.   Their route encircled Africa with stops on the east coast such as Beira and Mombasa thence through Suez and home.

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Courtesy G.S. Anderson - SM JAN/85

Thanks to Mr. Anderson and a certain quartermaster aboard the DURBAN CASTLE the evocative picture above was taken of the DUNNOTTAR CASTLE (1936) as seen from the DURBAN CASTLE between Ascension Island and St. Helena in the South Atlantic on July 19th 1958.   DUNNOTTAR CASTLE was homeward bound on her last voyage as a Union-Castle liner.   At that time Mr. Anderson was serving on DURBAN CASTLE  (1938) as a lamp trimmer.   The DUNNOTTAR CASTLE sailed on as the Greek cruise ship VICTORIA.   DURBAN CASTLE was broken up in Hamburg in 1962.

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RHODESIA CASTLE - Author's File

The RHODESIA CASTLE was described as an 'intermediate' in the fleet and satisfied the demands of both passenger and cargo itineraries.   She was built in 1951,  a handsome ship of 17,041 grt,  she had twin screws giving an average speed of 16 knots.

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Author's File

The picture above was taken by the author from the STIRLING CASTLE as we were pushing northwards to Madeira and ultimately Southampton.   In the unusually calm South Atlantic the TRANSVAAL CASTLE is seen passing on her way to Capetown.   Passengers would rush to their cabins for cameras at this event.  The proximity and thus the pleasure of the passengers would often depend on the combined 'nerve' of the captains as to how far the two large liners,  commensurate with safety,  would be apart.   The steam from her whistle may just be seen as she salutes her 'sister'.

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SA VAAL Courtesy Peter C. Kohler & SM Aug/05

S.A. VAAL was sold to Carnival Cruise Lines in September of 1977,  sailed from Southampton on October 29th to Kobe, Japan where she was re-built into the 1,432-berth cruise ship FESTIVALE.   Her maiden cruise was from Miami on October 28 (78?).  She was passed to Dolphin Cruise Lines in May of 1996 as ISLAND BREEZE  and continued cruising under the same name for Premier Cruise Lines in July of 1997,  including a long-term charter to Thomson Cruises.  With the collapse of Premier,  she was lid up in freeport, Bahamas in September of 2000 and was scrapped in Alang in July of 2003.  Southampton Castle and Good Hope Castle were sold in February 1978 to Cost Armatori and renamed PAOLA C and FRANCA C. respectively.  Both were eventually scrapped in China in 1984. 

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GOOD HOPE CASTLE - Courtesy Peter C. Kohler & SM Aug/05

The fastest diesel-powered freighters in the world when completed the SOUTHAMPTON CASTLE and GOOD HOPE CASTLE  were the first non-passenger carrying mail ships.  Two eight cylinder Sulzer diesels developed 34,720 bhp and they made 25 knots on trials.  Fitted with heavy lift derricks and extensive reefer space,  their deadweight capacity of 11,200 included special tanks for carriage of South African wine exports.  In October of 1967 both ships were fitted with 12 passenger berths at Cammell Laird of Birkenhead so they could continue the service to St. Helena Island.  This necessitated the enclosure of the Boat Deck,  the raising of the original pair of lifeboats and the addition of another pair.  

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Author's File

From the deck of the EDINBURGH CASTLE,  moored at Capetown,  the mail ship WINDSOR CASTLE is seen leaving the port on a very tranquill morning.   She will turn south shortly and thence along the coast to Port Elizabeth,  East London and then her turn around port of Durban.
 
While many passengers would disembark at Capetown,  others would join th ship for a coastal voyage which was very popular with South Africans.

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Author's File

Picture above taken by the author at the stern of the EDINBURGH CASTLE having just left "A" berth for a run up the coast stopping at Port Elizabeth,  East London and then the turning point at Durban.    A member of our catering staff gazes across at his colleagues aboard the PENDENNIS CASTLE  moored at "A" berth and loading for the U.K.

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Author's File

Some flushed faces are seen above in the dining saloon of the "STIRLING CASTLE" following 'happy hour'.   From the left,  Sally Kempthorne-purserette,  Ian McKendrick-4th officer,  Betty Hutcheson-children's nurse,  purser,  purser and radio officer (author).  The pursers will soon be occupied with games such as horse racing  (on a ship!),  bingo and dancing.   Also their supervising of the entertainment programme which was excellent aboard these larger mail ships.   The 4th mate will try and get some 'kip'  before going on watch with the 2nd mate for the 12 to 4.  I would relieve the 2nd R/O for  duty on the 8 to 12.    No satellite systems  (GMDSS) or GPS navigation systems aboard these ships but reliable and efficient communications none the less.    Union-Castle mail ships had regular radio schedules once a day whilst at sea and much company traffic would be passed for delivery  at the first port of call of the receiving vessel.

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Author's File

In a light moment above the 4th R/O is seen adjusting the 3rd R/O (author) aboard STIRLING CASTLE.  The 'hard working' radio department  (for the benefit of ex mates and/or engineers!!) was the envy of most departments as the station was normally shut down in port thus freeing up the members for sight seeing.  Often,  however,  depending on the Chief R/O,  radar, radio,  battery, antenna maintenance and accounts would be required .  Some antenna work is (was) being performed here.  The author in coveralls and Fraser Sharpe,  2nd R/O is to my right.  

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FIRE AT SEA WAS AND REMAINS THE BIGGEST NIGHTMARE FOR CREW MEMBERS.  THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION AND PICTURES HAVE BEEN SUPPLIED BY CAPTAIN PETER ASHCROFT, FORMERLY OF UNION-CASTLE MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY.  OTHER MORE HUMOROUS 'TALES' ARE PROVIDED ON HIS OWN PAGE.

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"GOOD HOPE CASTLE" - Courtesy Peter Ashcroft.

From the South Atlantic island of St Helena on 1st July, 1973, came a message that the 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE', which should have arrived there the previous evening, had been in radio silence, since leaving Ascension Island in the afternoon of 29th June.  Neither could her sistership, 'RMMV SOUTHAMPTON CASTLE', which was in the vicinity, raise her on radio telephone, and anxiety increased as the 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' became more and more overdue

Fears were confirmed in a later message from Ascension that the ship was ablaze and had been abandoned, burning and listing, but that everyone aboard was safe. The only tragedy was a little dog, that was too frightened to come out from beneath the Old Man’s bed!

The fire had broken out on 29th June, when the ship was only thirty-five miles from Ascension and bound for Cape Town, via St Helena.  A broken lubricating oil pipe to the starboard main engine turbo-blower sprayed oil onto an exhaust manifold, and before the resulting fire could be extinguished, it spread through the engine-room casing into the accommodation. The eighty-two passengers and crew took to the boats, spending some thirty-six hours in them before being taken on board the steam tanker, 'GEORGE F. GETTY' and landed at Ascension, where the passengers were accommodated in Georgetown, and the crew quartered at the United States Air Base.

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On the night of 1st-2nd July, the 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' was sighted by the 'SOUTHAMPTON CASTLE' some twenty-four miles off Portland Point, Ascension,  with a thirty degree starboard list, but no sign of fire or smoke, and with the port propellor visible in the swell.  Two days later, on 4th July, the motorship 'CLAN MALCOLM',  on a voyage to India arrived at the scene with the intentions of picking up part of the crew and putting them back aboard 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE', the remainder to be repatriated to Britain in 'SOUTHAMPTON CASTLE'.  At dusk that evening, the 'CLAN MALCOLM' circled the 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE', reporting evidence of further severe fires, with No. 6 Hatch covers glowing red, No 5 & 6 hatch deck cargo alight, flames on the portside of the accommodation and in the vicinity of No 4 hatch, and with the Bridge front collapsed.

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Next day, the 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' was drifting in a-near gale some 100 miles WNW of Ascension, still on fire.  An afterdeck cargo of drums had exploded, mail in No 5 & 6 hatches was burning, the midship accommodation was gutted, but the hull beneath the weather-deck was still seemingly intact and in good condition.

BELOW, THE "GOOD HOPE CASTLE", HAVING MORE OR LESS BURNT HERSELF OUT, IS AWAITING THE CONTRACTED TOW FROM MT "ALBERTROSS" OF HAMBURG.  THE "CLAN MALCOLM", BOUND FOR INDIA, IS STANDING BY TO RENDER ANY ASSISTANCE REQUIRED,  WHILST THERE'S ONE OF HER WALLOWING IN THE VICINITY OF THE MAIL BOAT, AND ONE QUIETLY SLEEPING ALONGSIDE AT ADEN.

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SOME OF THE DECK CARGO AROUND HATCHES 5 & 6 MAY BE SEEN IN THIS PICTURE.

At this time, the West German ocean salvage tug 'ALBATROSS' (871 grt, 1965) was called on for assistance, and on 7th July 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' was boarded by a Union-Castle Superintendent, albeit, briefly, to report that there were no flames or smoke, but that the deck was severely buckled and hot, with the Bridge and accommodation completely gutted.

Two days later, the tug was alongside, able to put pumps aboard, and prepare a towing connection.

'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' was taken in tow for originally Dakar, at an average speed of 5 knots, with every indication that the fire ravaged areas were starting to cool down, and the list reduced to 5-7 degrees.  Dakar was by-passed with intentions of calling at Las Palmas, but permission was refused to enter port, but stores taken on board. Antwerp was eventually arrived at safely on 18th August.

Immediate inspection revealed that fire had destroyed the entire midships structure, including the Bridge deck, and Navigating bridge, with only the funnel and internal uptakes intact. The weather deck and poop were buckled and cracked, and hatch covers, deck machinery, masts and derricks and their housings were fire-damaged.

There was also distortion to the shell-plating in the way of the engine-room and ‘tween decks. Generally, the machinery spaces were found to be relatively undamaged, and a subsequent dry-docking showed no twisting, hogging or sagging of the hull structure.

Tenders for repair were invited, a 1000tonnes of steel renewals being estimated as necessary.

On 28th September, 'GOOD HOPE CASTLE' departed Antwerp, under the tow of another Bugsier tug 'HEROS' ( 479 grt 1964 ) bound for Bilbao and the ship repair yard of Astilleros Espanoles.SA arriving on the 9th October.

After extensive repairs, 'RMMV GOOD HOPE CASTLE' departed Bilbao on 19th May 1974, and arrived at Southampton to resume her position in the mail service to South Africa,

Departing Southampton on 31st May 1974.

                                                                        

THE GUEST BOOK MAY BE FOUND AT THE FOOT OF THE  "INTRODUCTION"  PAGE.

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