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THE THREE "DELS" & DELTA CRUISE LINES
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WEATHER SHIPS (BRITISH & NORTH AMERICAN)
RADIO OFFICER NOSTALGIA
R/O GALLERY
FOUR YEARS OF FUN WITH ANCHOR LINE by Ian Walker
"A SEAGOING SAGA" - Trevor Inman
ALAN SHARD - WARTIME MN REMINISCENCES
CAPT'N PETER ASHCROFT, EXPLOITS OF
SEA STORIES & OTHERS
AIME'S STORY & PICTORIALS
MEMOIRS OF A RADIO OFFICER
RELATED SITES

olivebanksail.jpg
From a painting by Hans Skalagard - SM Feb/97

The picture above depicts the OLIVEBANK sailing up to her anchorage at Falmouth.

The reproduction from the painting by Hans Skalagard was impressed upon a Christmas card sent to Andy Flowers by a Captain Jeff Mann and Brian Lucy of Bank Line in 1985 and shows the "Olivebank by Moonlight".  This four-masted barque had lain undisturbed for 57 years until located in June of 1996 by St. Albans Sub-Aqua Club divers,  led by Andy Flowers.
 
The OLIVEBANK was built in 1892 at the Scottish yard of Mackie & Thomson.   She was a steel four-masted barque of 2,824 gross tons,  326 feet long,  with a breadth of 43.1 feet and a depth of 24.5 feet.  The ship was built for Andrew Weir & Co, Bank Line.   She served them for over 20 years but had a chequered hisstory and was once scuttled following a fire in Port Guaymas in 1911.  She was fortunately raised and repaired following that misadventure.  She also survived two other incidents of lost rigging during her 47 year life.
 
Many accounts have been written of voyages on board the OLIVEBANK,  including one entitled 'Rolling round the Horn' by Claude Muncaster,  the author and artist, who painted the romantic Christmas card view of the 'Olivebank by Moonlight'.  His book covered a voyage in 1933.

theroybank.jpg
Courtesy SHIPS MONTHLY

Above the "ROYBANK" approaches Latchford Locks on her way through the Manchester Ship Canal.

clydebank.jpg
Courtesy Richard H. Myers - SM DEC/92

A waterfront scene at Hull with Bank Line's motor vessel "CLYDEBANK"  (1974/11,405 grt) receiving tug assistance on July 25th 1992.

 
The BANK LINE,  registered by Andrew Weir in 1905 to market his growing network of cargo liner services,  for several decades pursued a policy of planned fleet replacement contracted with British shipbuilding yards.  The Line's last such order was placed in 1977 at the site of the old Doxford yard in Sunderland.

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Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield - SM May/91

bankboatx.jpg
Unknown Bank Line vessel alongside at Birkenhead - Courtesy Ray Simes

Between 1973 and 1975 a major investment in an undercover yard took place and eight Bank Line vessels were constructed there between 1976 and 1978.  The final order,  for six vessels of an advanced design,  which became the "Fish" Class,  was completed in 1979 and the yard has since closed.
 
The "Fish" Class rarely visited the United Kingdon during their short careers with the Bank Line and the one cargo liner service from the UK,  between Hull and the South Pacific,  continued to be tonnaged by the Meadowbank Class,  built by Swan Hunter in 1973.

bank1.jpg
Courtesy Andrew Weir - SM Feb/97

The CLYDEBANK  (1974/11,956 grt) was one of two vessels operating on a new service introduced in 1996 between South & East Africa,  the Arabian Gulf,  India and Pakistan called the Bank Ellerman Line.   Up to nine passengers were carried by the CLYDEBANK and her sister ship the FORTHBANK on monthly sailings.
 
The CLYDEBANK and her sisters were replaced on Bank Line's round the world service in 1996 by four former Russian cargo vessels which were refitted and converted into multi-purpose/container ships with ro-ro facility and deep-tanks for carrying vegetable oil.  One of the new fleet at the time ,  the FOYLEBANK  (1983/18,641 grt) frequented Papeete, Tahiti where she loaded coconut oil.  These ships carried twelve passengers each on voyages which could take up to four months.  

bank2.jpg
FORTHBANK - Courtesy Andrew Weir SM Feb/97

The services on which the "Fish" Class were employed by the Bank Line were the U.S.A.-South Africa route,  which was inaugurated by the ROACHBANK in April of 1980,  and the Far East-South Africa trade.  It was not uncommon for the vessels to be chartered out to other operators and the TENCHBANK was renamed ALS STRENGTH for a six-month charter to Ahrenkiel Liner Services in 1986,  also on the Far East to South Africa trade.  Both ROACHBANK and RUDDBANK were involved in rescuing Vietnamese boat people in 1979.

bank3.jpg
RUDDBANK - Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield SM May/91

The RUDDBANK (above) was completed in 1979,  photographed in her original colours in 1983,  the year she first changed ownership.
Below, seen in her next 'guise' as NAPIER STAR.

bank4.jpg
NAPIER STAR - Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield SM MAY/91

The first vessel to be sold was the RUDDBANK which was positioned to the UK by taking a sugar cargo from Mauritius to London in October 1983.  She was renamed ROMNEY at Rotterdam by Lambert & Holt and loaded her first of several cargoes for the Falklands at Avonmouth towards the end of 1983.  For the return voyages she loaded at South American ports on the BRISA service,  discharging at Liverpool.   However,  once the Falklands contract had expired she was redeployed within the Vestie Group and was positioned, via Karachi,  in the summer of 1986,  to the South Pacific for a cargo liner service to the West Coast of USA/Canada.
Initially renamed LAIRG,  she was renamed NAPIER STAR in 1989 and continued to trade as such.

bankx1.jpg
ex DACEBANK - Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield SM May/91

All five remaining vessels were sold in 1987 when it was decided to abandon the Far East-South African trade and charter in tonnage on the USA-South African route.  Two vessels were sold to Lendoudis,  a Greek shipowner established at Athens in 1973,  who had purchased a pair of Bank Line ships in 1978/79,  the LAURELBANK and the ROWANBANK which needed replacement.

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ex RUDDBANK - Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield SM May/91

Thus,  PIKEBANK became WESTMAN and TENCHBANK the EASTMAN under his ownership.  In an unusual deal with a British shipowner operating under the name Tamahine,  the EASTMAN was sold later in 1989 to become TAMATHAI while another Bank Line vessel,  CRESTBANK, which had been purchased from Tamahine in 1987 and renamed NORTHMAN  (ex-TAMATHAI) was sold back to Tamahine in 1988 and renamed TAMAMIMA. 
 
A pair was also taken by, possibly,  American interests and flagged out to the Bahamas.  ROACHBANK was renamed DEVO at Yokohama,  initially reports as owned by Kawasaki of Japan,  and the TROUTBANK was renamed BRIJ at Kobe.  It seems that both vessels were initially managed by Aegeus Shipping of Piraeus but were later managed by Trishui Ship Management of New York.

bankx3.jpg
ex PIKEBANK - Courtesy Malcolm Cranfield SM May/91

The final vessel,  DACEBANK, was sold to Leond Maritime of Piraeus,  an operator established in 1967 who, prior to 1990,  moved up market towards tonnage suitable to liner operators.  As the ANNA L she visited Liverpool in February of 1988 on charter to T & J Harrison, and has recently been working for the US Government supplying the Gulf forces.
 
Since their sale by bank Line,  with the one exception of RUDDBANK while trading as ROMNEY,  the class has continued to largely trade away from the UK and Europe,  the emphasis being on service in the Far East and South America.  The arrival of  PIKEBANK as WESTMAN at Liverpool in 1991, on charter to Eurosal from South America,  was therefore something of an occasion.

banker.jpg
Courtesy W. Paul Clegg - SM Oct/97

The Bank Line cargo vessel CLYDEBANK (1974/11,956 grt) anchored off Mumbai (Bombay to those of us who remember...)

clydein1.jpg
Courtesy W. Paul Clegg - SM Oct/97

The dayroom area of the owner's suite aboard CLYDEBANK.

bankin2.jpg
Courtesy W. Paul Clegg - SM Oct/97

The officer's dining saloon which was also used by passengers.

The round-the-world service, visiting South Pacific ports,  operated by Bank Line  (Andrew Weir Shipping) had long been popular with travellers preferring cargo ships to cruise liners.  By the middle of 1996,  the company had introduced four larger, newer ships with roll-on/roll-off capability to the service.  New services were then found for the four older ships so displaced,  two of which were earmarked for a revived link between South Africa,  East Africa,  the Gulf and the Indian sub-continent.
 

Accordingly, from July of 1996 the CLYDEBANK and then the FORTHBANK started the monthly service from Durban on a round trip scheduled to last about 56 days,  calling at Dar-es-Salaam,  Mombasa,  Jebel Ali (Dubai),  Karachi, Mumbai (Bombay) returning to Durban via Mombasa.  Additionally, a call was usually made at one other port in the Gulf,  often Dammam in Saudi Arabia.  Passengers could join, and leave, the ship at any port of their choice, and expect to be charged US $100 per day fully inclusive,  except for personal items such as drinks at the bar and runs ashore. Additionally,  a call was usually made at one other port in the Gulf,  often Dammam in Saudi Arabia.  Passengers could join,  and leave,  the ship at any port of their choice and expect to be charged US$100
There were four twin-bedded cabins,  including the owners suite,  and one single.  All were very spacious,  with full en-suite facilities,  TV and video players,  (the ship's video library was extensive,  as was it's book collection),  tea and coffee makers,  refrigerators and,  of course,  outside views.  There was also a passenger's lounge at the after end of the passenger deck,  walled on three sides by floor-to-ceiling glass  (referred to by the crew as 'the aquarium')  giving unrivalled views.  Passengers ate with the officers in the airy dining saloon,  but access to the officer's lounge bar was normally by invitation only,  an invitation which was usually readily forthcoming as officers and passengers became better acquainted.
 
The ships themselves were of the geared,  'tween-decker type,  with a deadweight of 15,200 and so carried a wide variety of cargoes.  Not for them the simple operation of merely loading and unloading containers,  which could be boring for a passenger and could result in very short stays in port.  Of course,  these ships did carry containers, but also practically anything else as well.  Bagged rice and spices,  steel in various forms (coils, rods, plates and girders,  forest products (paper, chipboard and the like), second hand cars and new safari coaches are examples of what appeared on the manifests.  Just watching the loading and unloading of these,  usually by ship's gear,  could be a fascinating pastime and could result in extended port visits,  offering the passenger plenty of opportunities for going ashore in most ports.
 
Sailing on certain sections of the itinerary brought back memories of British India,  which for nearly 130 years had operated for passengers and cargo between the Gulf,  Karachi and Bombay until 1982,  when the last passenger-cargo ship in BI colours,  the DWARKA, was withdrawn.  The BI service between Bombay and East Africa lasted until about 1966,  while Bank Line itself had been closely associated with services linking South Africa with the Indian sub-Continent,  on which passengers were carried prior to 1939,  until the 1960s.

bankbw.jpg
Courtesy Roy Cressey - SM AUG/86

Above, the motor vessel CRESTBANK  (1978/12,238 grt)  is seen laid up in the River Fal alongside the CAPE AVANTI DUE.  She was sold to the Tamahine Shipping Co. in 1986 and renamed TAMATHAI.

(The final section of the above text is an extract taken from "A Bank Line Freighter Voyage" included in the October 1997 edition of Ship's Monthly wherein W. Paul Clegg describes a voyage to Gulf & Indian Ocean ports aboard the CLYDEBANK.)

The MORAYBANK (1973/11,405 grt) was chartered out in 1984 to become the TOANA PAPUA but eventually reverted to her original name.  In her place the MEADOWBANK became the TOANA NIUGINI.  Both ships measured 162X23m  (530 X 75 ft).  They had a TEU capacity of 240 and a mix of cranes and derricks to serve their five hatches.  Doxford machinery of 15,000 bhp gave a speed of 18.75 knots.  Six of this design were built by Swan Hunter 1973-74 and,  of these,  the lead ship CORABANK traded in the eighties as the UNICOSTA.
 
On occasion the Bank Line chartered in various ships,  two of which changed their names and livery.  These were the German CHARLOTTA (1978/9,313 grt),  owned by Peter Dohle of Hamburg and Bernard Schulte (1978/8,557 grt) which had been chartered to Lloyd Brasiliero and renamed LLOYD RECIFE and LLOYD MEDITERRANEO respectively.  Over the two year period 1979-81 both operated under Bank Line colours,  the former as the TESTBANK,  the latter as the TIELBANK.

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